JAMAICA POND PROJECT

36 Perkins St., PO Box 300040, Jamaica Plain, MA 02130-0030

Gerry Wright, Founder and President

Telephone: 617-524-7070

Email: FrederickLawOlmsted@yahoo.com

TTY/MA RELAY 800-439-2370

www.FriendsOfJamaicaPond.org

Jamaica Pond Project

History and Annual Park Keeper Award

Frederick Law Olmsted a one-man play by Gerry Wright

Nature's Class Room: Environmental Education Projects

Environmental Research Projects

Forestry Protection Projects

Emerald Necklace Bird Club

Volunteer Stewardship Program

Calendar and Meetings and Press

Memberships and Donations

Links and Resources

Contact and Email Info

 
"Let it be not for present use and delight alone, but let it be of such a work that our descendents will thank us for it."
Frederick Law Olmsted

Nature's
Class Room:

Environmental
Education
Projects

Jamaica Pond's Albino Gray Squirrel

Eastern Chipmunk


Cottontail Rabbits

Great Horned Owls

Red Tailed Hawks


Butterflies and Dragonflies

Emerald Necklace Wildflowers

Pink Lady's Slipper

Great Blue Herons

Emerald Necklace Fungi (Coming Soon)

Boston's Emerald Necklace

CEDAR WAXWING

Ampelis Americano, Picotera, Chinito


by Stephen Baird info@CommunityArtsAdvocates.org

Cedar Waxwing - Bombycilla cedrorum

  • Cedar Waxwings are seen all year in the Emerald Necklace. Flocks of 15-100 plus birds also pass through during migrations from Central America to Canada.
  • Adult birds grow to 6-7 inches in size with a 9-12 inches wingspan and weigh 1-2 ounces. Life span is around 8 years. Plumage is a cinnamon brown color with a black face mask and crested head feathers. Tail feathers are tipped with a yellow or orange band. Secondary wing feathers are tipped with red which reminded early naturalists of their letter red sealing wax.
  • Song: A long high pitched buzz TweeZeeeee.
  • Cedar Waxwings primary food source are berries and fruits.  They also eat flower blossoms, insects and worms. The reliance on fruits as a food source causes them to search for food in nomadic flocks over large areas as well as nesting later in the summer to have plenty of berries to feed their young.
  • Audubon and other naturalists have noted Cedar Waxwings can eat so many berries and fruits that they are unable to fly. Waxwings can also become intoxicated after eating fermented berries.
  • Cedar Waxwings are a very social bird and remain in flocks most of the year.  They repeatedly pass berries, flower petals and insects between each other as part of the both the flock social order and mating rituals.  There is also a little dance hop component to the mating ritual.
  • Cedar Waxwings are also know as Cedar Birds for their frequent visits to Eastern Red Cedar trees to eat the juniper cone that looks like a little blue berry.

References and Links


Contact and Email Information

JAMAICA POND PROJECT

36 Perkins St., PO Box 300040, Jamaica Plain, MA 02130-0030

Gerry Wright, Founder and President

Telephone: 617-524-7070

Email: FrederickLawOlmsted@yahoo.com

TTY/MA RELAY 800-439-2370

www.FriendsOfJamaicaPond.org

For translations into different languages -- Arabic, Chinese, Italian, French, German, Russian, Spanish or others visit the web site: http://babel.altavista.com

Community Arts Advocates

Copyright 1999-2017 by Stephen Baird